NSHA rape failure

This an outrageous failure of the Nova Scotia Health Authority.

http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1593958-truro-hospital-turns-rape-victim-away

How can an organization whose senior executives – CEO Janet Knox and VP Medicine Dr. Lynne Harrigan – are female be so cruel, so uncaring, so dysfunctional towards sexual assault victims? How can these two executives be so disconnected from the harsh reality of violence against women?

And how is it that only certain hospitals have rape teams?

I hope every Nova Scotian sends this link to their MLA. That young woman could be anyone’s daughter, granddaughter, niece, neighbour, friend, work colleague – even if she’s a stranger, no one deserves to be dismissed like this. For hospital staff to send any young woman, let alone a rape victim, out into the night alone boggles the mind.

Please, contact your MLA, regardless if they are in government or opposition. This must stop! Obviously the job of running the NSHA is above what those in charge are capable of managing. It is time for a change at the top.

 

Postscript: Since publishing this piece, one retired physician in Nova Scotia wrote:

“It’s part of the ongoing efforts (perhaps not intentional) to reduce access to personalized care.

“For the first 30 years of my practice emergency departments called the person’s family doctor who would respond, or the person in their call group. Most doctors had their phone numbers available to patients.  Although these “on call” services were free, the fees for paid activities was sufficient so people could cross subsidize work that was not financially rewarded, but where the rewards were professional.

“Now, most primary care docs cannot provide much in the way of free services because excess administrative demands leave them little free time, and their fees for useful work are inadequate.”

 

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4 Responses to NSHA rape failure

  1. LEE MCCLAIR says:

    NOVA SCOTIA HEALTH AUTHORITY UNDER KNOX AND HARRIGAN AND LETS NOT FORGET THE MAN WHO THINKS GLYPHOSATE IS SAFE ARE BREAKING U.N. DEFINITION OF HUMAN RIGHTS. WE ARE LIVING IN A PROVINCE EMBEDED IN THE 19TH CENTURY . MY ADVICE TO ANYONE GOING TO A HOSPITAL EMERGENCY WARD IS MAKE SURE YOU BRING SOMEONE WITH YOU AS A WITNESS AND TAPE EVERYTHING IN AUDIO . IF THE ORDINARY PEOPLE HAD A CLUE AS TO WHAT GOES ON THEY WOULD LEAVE HERE FIRST CHANCE. OF COURSE THIS IS ALREADY HAPPENING . NOVA SCOTIA IS NOT A SAFE PLACE FOR ILL PEOPLE . WHAT IT IS COSTING IN LAW SUITS WOULD BE BETTER SPENT ON PATIENT CARE. WHAT HAPPENED TO THIS WOMAN JUST MAKES ME WEEP .

  2. buddyboy546 says:

    In fairness to the NSHA, a major question is do they have a policy for such circumstances? If not, the NSHA management rightfully must fully wear it. If they do have a policy, what is it and was it adhered to? Of course, in that the board operates in total secrecy, these are the types of things that remain hidden. What are the board’s major concerns, what considerations are consuming their time and attention? Who knows? In any case, common sense and decency dictates a far different response than occurred in this case.

    • I suppose they are studying it. I think the people of Nova Scotia would be astonished at all the situations that arise that this authority and executive haven’t policies for. If not to the local hospital, where is a rape victim to go? At the very least hospitals and clinics in any community which houses a university and or college, where young people are away from home for the first time, should have the ability to deal with sexual violence. Such a policy should have been in place before the merger of health authorities.

      As for having a policy, I’m reminded of those times when patients or others have collapsed on hospital property, but outside the building. In those situations, even though a person could be on the ground in sight of an ER or doctor or other medical professional, the (unwritten) policy is not to help that person, but to call 9-1-1. The most famous case occurred outside Soldiers Memorial Hospital in Middleton in December 2009. An 83-year-old woman ran into the ER to say her 81-year-old husband was in the car and having a heart attack. Rather than rushing to her/their assistance, ER staff suggested this woman call 9-1-1. Staff wouldn’t even make the call for her! When the Annapolis Valley District Health Authority, headed by Janet Knox and Lynne Harrigan, made the national news, they promised to “study” the situation and develop a protocol for such instances. If such a protocol exists, hospital staff don’t know of it.

      So with that history of inaction and a cavalier attitude towards helping in an emergency situation, why should we expect this executive or their decorative board to do anything?

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